Gah, Skittens EVERYWHERE

den2cypher:

anatomicalart:

briannacherrygarcia:

itscourtoon:

bathsabbath:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

Such baby bullshit. Don’t even get out of bed for these rates.

    If you are an artist who wants to make money off their art, I highly suggest you buy The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook. It goes in depth about copyright issues and even contains contract and model release templates. The 2013 book *I believe* states the average professional charges $72 an hour. This article calculated that to make a 40k annual salary you would need to charge about $60 per hour.

  After graduating from Art Center in 2012, I think I asked for somewhere between $35-45 an hour and got laughed at by multiple big name clients, which was infuriating, sadly expected, and terrifying with over $100K worth of student loans staring me in the face. If they tell you it will be “great exposure” that’s a red flag. Ask yourself how their exposure can compare to your Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook pages combined? 

And when you do get a decent paying gig, PROTECT YOURSELF. You have the right to negotiate and revise a contract. Do not start a job until you have a contract signed. If they don’t provide you with one, MAKE ONE. And make sure you have your bases covered. You can specify in a contract that maybe two revisions are included in your cost, and if they ask you to revise the piece more than twice, they will have to pay extra. In terms of payment schedule, I usually do the 50/50 Method (50% before, 50% after) or the 3/3/3 Method (1/3 before, 1/3 in the middle, 1/3 after all work has been received). Both of those are pretty standard in the industry, as they guarantee you will get compensated for your time, even if the job goes bad.

Remember you have a skill, and you have spent time honing that skill and you deserve to be adequately paid for that time and effort. You will have clients dismiss you because, honest to God they think, “Well, I could do that if I wanted. Hell, my five year old does it now.” No they can’t, because they didn’t, they don’t, they won’t and they probably never will. And good luck hiring a five year old. They can’t keep a fucking deadline.

And in a last ditch effort they’ll say, “But that drawing only took you an hour!” Son, that drawing took me 20. fucking. years.

10 Dollars for 1 minute of animation.  Oh my god my heart.  It took my team 6 months and a team of 12 to make a 4 minute short. 

The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook

I second this book! I’ve had it for several years now, and it’s been a HUGE help in my work as a freelance artist. It gives great advice on what to charge for different areas of art!

Please remember. Your art is worth a respectable payment! Accepting ridiculously low prices actually hurts the arts/illustration/animation communities because it makes employers believe they can employ people without offering decent pay.


Check the internet if you need help figuring out what you should be charging for your commissions. Invest in the books that will inform you professionally, and put your foot down if you think someone is trying to cheat you out of your time and hard work.
You have a right to refuse a job, and/or request decent payment. If your employer denies a you decent pay, well then they’re probably not a very good employer.
Do not undersell your skills. it is bad for the art community and you are worth more then that.

If you’re an artist, please please please… your commission prices play a big part in this.  If you take commissions for cheaps other people think that’s a regular and they expect other artists to do the same. 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

coelasquid:

summoner-rena:

IF YOU ARE STREAMING, DON’T USE PROCASTER.

DON’T. USE. PROCASTER.

Livestream procaster consumes large amounts of cpu for nothing. No joke, nothing. As a result your stream can become laggy and sometimes it can damage your hardware as your PC has to push itself to keep what your streaming functioning as well as possible.

"But if we can’t use procaster what can we use insteaaaaad?"

Simple. There’s two programs, both that are free, that you can use that uses very little CPU and has more options than procaster. These programs are called Xsplit and OBS. To keep your head in one piece, I’m going to go over how to stream on Livestream with Xsplit.

Under the cut of course.

Read More

Save this for later, everyone told me to use Procaster when I asked what to livestream with

writtenbymadeline:

A tool to use for find Synonyms: Synonym Finder.

This is a great, unique little tool I found by browsing for writing resources. It’s name speaks for itself: it’s a synonym finder.

The site is clean cut, has soothing colors, and to-the point results for any word you look up.

For example, when I look up the word “romance,” I get this:

Synonyms: romance, romanticism
Definition: an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)

Hypernyms: quality
Definition: an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone
Usage: the quality of mercy is not strained—Shakespeare”

I had no idea what a “hypernym” is. Apparently it’s a word with a more general meaning that a more specific word fall under. Like, color is a hypernym for green.

On the right corner there’s a button to make graphs! So you can trace each synonym from it’s root word, and see how far the other synonyms connect in comparison to others.

I really like it, so I’m going to definitely bookmark it on my writing tools list.

coelasquid:

Here is a super nifty little thing I was gifted by the people over at HelloNomad.com, so that I could review it and share it with you, the lovely people of the internet. It’s a charge key (they come in iPhone and android varieties) about the size of a key. It’s super flexible and resilient, you can basically tie it in a knot and it still does it’s job. It’s tiny, lightweight, and easily attached to your keychain.

I dunno how many of you are like me and work yourself to the point of exhaustion then pass out for the night without remembering to plug in your phone, but this thing has saved me on multiple occasions. And made me the cool and popular life of the party when friends have forgotten theirs as well. Especially as my phone gets older and the battery starts to show it’s age, having a tiny portable charge key I can clip to my wallet chain and forget about until and emergency arises is a lifesaver. The handsome new and improved model (I think mine is a prototype from the first wave) will run you $29 over on the Nomad site with orders set to ship in September.

The only criticism I would make for it is if you’re a dolt like me who carries a huge wad of keys that you’ve forgotten the function of but don’t want to get rid of because you know after they’re lost forever you’ll immediately remember what they unlock, it can be a little unwieldy to take this thing on and off your key ring over and over again every time you want to use it. But if that’s the case they’ve got you covered on that front too with the Nomad clip (shipping October 31st for iPhone and Android, $39 usd) a conveniently clipable carabiner chargekey.

So yeah, super nifty little gizmo, have enjoyed thoroughly, would recommend to anyone who wants to play cell phone games in all their downtime without their battery crapping out at 4 pm or having to remember to stuff a charger cable in their pocket every morning. Check it out if you are in the market for such a lovely thing.

envyivygreen:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

also there is a period tracking app called “clue” its got a nice genderneutral name and the name doesnt scream I HAVE PERIODS I HAVE A VAGINA so its really nice if you are trans or genderqueer

methblue:

uptownzurban:

Please!!! I encourage anyone who follows me or sees this to sign this petition. My city is under a lot of distress right now for this wrongful doing. Here is the link to sign the petition… https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/mike-brown-law-requires-all-state-county-and-local-police-wear-camera/8tlS5czf

see this makes more sense, change.org wouldn’t do shit but here the government HAS to look at it

methblue:

uptownzurban:

Please!!! I encourage anyone who follows me or sees this to sign this petition. My city is under a lot of distress right now for this wrongful doing. Here is the link to sign the petition… https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/mike-brown-law-requires-all-state-county-and-local-police-wear-camera/8tlS5czf

see this makes more sense, change.org wouldn’t do shit but here the government HAS to look at it

tomscholes:

These will come in handy, thanks Daniel !
He’s got another sheet on his tumblr you might also want :)

mumblingsage:

xekstrinavidad:

fictionwritingtips:

thebluebird:

A professional script reader read 300 screenplays for five different studios, all the while tracking the many recurring problems. The infographic he made with the collected data offers a glimpse at where screenwriting goes wrong.

pay attention to this

this is important even if you don’t write scripts

This is exceedingly important to all storytellers

ss-sebastianstan:

"horses are such majestic creatures!"

image

amandaonwriting:

If you are writing for fun, and if you don’t want any help, please write any way that works for you. I am not trying to convert you to writing with a plan. It truly does not matter to me how you write. However, if you are struggling to finish a book that makes sense, I would love you to carry on reading.

Why should you do it?

When I used to teach Writers Write regularly, one of the first things I asked students was: How does your story end? I did this for two reasons. Firstly, as much as some people love the idea of working with meandering storylines, it has been my experience that those writers seldom finish writing a coherent book. Secondly, most people who go to workshops or sign up for courses are truly looking for help, and I’ve learned that the best way to succeed in anything in life is to have a plan. Successful people will tell you that you need to know where you’re going before you begin.

Smell the roses

This does not mean that you can’t take time to smell the roses, or explore hidden paths along the way. It simply means that you always have a lifeline and when you get lost, it will be easier for you to find your way back again. Remember that readers like destinations. They love beginnings, middles, and endings. Why do you think fans are terrified that George R.R. Martin will die before he finishes A Song of Fire and Ice? They want to know how the story ends. 

Here are seven reasons why I suggest you write your ending first.

  1. If you know who the characters are at the end of the story, you will know how much you should reveal about them at the beginning. 
  2. You will be forced out of the ‘backstory hell’ that beginner writers inhabit and into the story the reader wants to read.
  3. Hindsight is an amazing thing. We all know how different life seems when we’re looking back. We can often tell where a problem began. We think about the ‘what ifs’ with the gift of hindsight. You can use this to your advantage in fiction writing.
  4. You will have something to work towards. Instead of aimlessly writing and hoping for the muse to show you the way, you will be able to pull the characters’ strings and write the words they need to get them from the beginning through the middle to the end.
  5. Plotting from the ending backwards saves you so much time because you will leave out stuff that isn’t meant to be there. You will not have to muddle through an overwritten first draft.
  6. Writing the end forces most of us out of our comfort zones. We have to confront the reality of what we are doing. It might not be as romantic as flailing around like a helpless maiden, but if you want writing to be your profession, it’s good to make the outcome visible. This is a way to show yourself that you are serious. The end gives you a goal to work towards.
  7. The ending is as important as the beginning. Good beginnings get people to read your first book. Great endings get readers to buy your second book.

There are a handful of famous authors, like Stephen King and George R.R. Martin, who say they don’t plot. I think they just don’t realise they are those rare authors – natural born storytellers, and that plotting is instinctive for them. I have interviewed many successfully published authors and I can revel that the majority of them do believe in plotting. They outline, in varying degrees, before they begin. And yes, most of them know what their ending will be. Why don’t you try it? What have you got to lose?

I truly hope this helps you write, and finish, your book.

by Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy 10 (Amazingly Simple) Tips to Get You Back on The Writing Track and The Author’s Promise- two things every writer should do. You could also read The Top 10 Tips for Plotting and Finishing a Book.

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

image

BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

image

AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

image

AND STILL MORE

image

image

SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

image

PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

Feeling suicidal? Can’t talk on phones?

transbear:

horrorpeach:

crankyskirt:

IMAlive is a live online network that uses instant messaging to respond to people in crisis. People need a safe place to go during moments of crisis and intense emotional pain.

https://www.imalive.org/

this is brilliant

AMAZING. BOOST IT.

martianwitchery:

I’m gonna respond publicly because I know you’re not the only one that needs to hear this.
Posting other people’s fanart without a link to the source, where the artist of the fanart originally posted it, is not truly sharing it. It’s like if I were to show you a cookie, like really let you get a good look at that cookie, AND IT’S A REALLY NICE LOOKING COOKIE, and then not actually give you that cookie but still say that I “shared” it with you. If you’ve seen a cookie like that before you can probably guess what flavor it is—if I’ve seen that fanart before I can probably recognize who the artist is (and that it’s not you)—but you can’t really be sure.  So if you post, and I mean upload a file you’ve saved on your computer and post someone else’s fanart without telling me who made it, for all I know, you did. And without probably even trying, you’ve claimed someone else’s work as your own. There’s one problem already. Here come more.
Artists often include their opinions and ideas about their art when they post it, and they’re often important to understanding what the artist meant for the picture to be about. Artists also often try to actually make money from posting their art online by taking commissions.  Artist also like to get feedback on their work, even if it’s just in the form of a like/reblog/favorite/whatever, so they can feel like they’re not wasting their time making things.
Here’s what you’re doing when you post art without sourcing it, whether you mean to or not:
——You’re saying that whatever you think about the art is more important that what the actual person who made it has to say about it. I said “neither of these pictures were made for you to use in a story” because by posting them unsourced, you’re treating them like that’s what they were made for, and acting entitled to them. You are not entitled to other people’s creations and no one owes you their work. Obviously if someone actually does draw something for you to use in a story, that’s different, and it’s between you and them what they do and don’t mind you doing with it.  But I know you’ve posted at least one picture without asking the artist first because I was the artist of one of them and I was not asked.  I’m not saying don’t get inspired by things or don’t voice your opinion on things! Just don’t prioritize getting your thoughts out there about a picture someone else drew over the thoughts of the person who drew it. Source the picture, and give the people who see your posts the opportunity to hear what the artist has to say.
——You’re also potentially messing with someone’s source of income. Say you post an unsourced picture by an artist named Bob. I see that picture and think “wow, I really like that style! I wouldn’t mind paying to have something drawn for me in that style!” But you’ve given me no way of knowing Bob drew that, and no way to find Bob. Meanwhile Bob on Bob’s blog or Bob’s deviantART account or wherever Bob posts Bob’s art is doing commissions—but without me knowing where to find Bob and purchase one, Bob just lost a potential customer! Source the picture, and help artists’ businesses instead of hurting them.
——You’re denying the artist the opportunity to get feedback on their work. Imagine spending 12 hours staring blankly at a screen, getting wrists cramps and feeling your eyes water and burn, until you finally finish a drawing. You post it on tumblr, and get maybeeeeeee 20 notes in the first few days it’s up.  Someone else sees your work, they post—not reblog—it on their own blog without including a link back to you or your original post, and suddenly your art’s got 200 notes on someone else’s blog. They’re getting the notifications, they’re getting the likes and the reblogs with comments like “omigosh that’s so pretty!!!!”, and you’re getting nothing. Doesn’t that sound like it would hurt? Would you feel like sharing your art again if that’s all you’re going to get out of it? It happens every day, and plenty of artists just quit sharing their art because of it. Source the picture, and don’t let artist feel like they’re just wasting their time.
Most of the art on my blog is either reblogged or my own. If I do make an original post of someone else’s art, I include a source. Reblog the original tumblr post if there is one. If the art is from somewhere other than tumblr, like deviantART or blogspot, include a link to the deviation or to the artist’s page when you post it. If you saved it forever ago and you don’t remember where you found it, or if it’s from somewhere like weheartit or fanpop or anywhere where people just dump images they’ve found but not necessarily made, there are still options. “I didn’t make this” or “Pic not mine” are not sources. Reverse Google Image Search is a start, and here’s a link telling you how to use it.  Basically you put in an image and it gives you potential sources. If the artist signed the art with their url, go to that url and go through their art tag (or the tag on their blog for the ship/character the art is about if they don’t have an art tag!).  If you’re not willing to hunt for the source, or you’ve hunted and nothing’s come up, don’t post it. Seriously. Because if you do, all you’re doing is getting yourself notes and attention someone else should be getting.
I’m not telling you to not appreciate pretty pictures anymore, or to not be inspired by them. I’m not telling you you’re not allowed to save images on your computer, or even that you’re not allowed to post them on your tumblr, so long as you include the source.
No, you’re not the only one that does this. Yes, thousands of other people do it. That doesn’t mean it’s okay. Don’t be #1,001.

martianwitchery:

I’m gonna respond publicly because I know you’re not the only one that needs to hear this.

Posting other people’s fanart without a link to the source, where the artist of the fanart originally posted it, is not truly sharing it. It’s like if I were to show you a cookie, like really let you get a good look at that cookie, AND IT’S A REALLY NICE LOOKING COOKIE, and then not actually give you that cookie but still say that I “shared” it with you. If you’ve seen a cookie like that before you can probably guess what flavor it is—if I’ve seen that fanart before I can probably recognize who the artist is (and that it’s not you)—but you can’t really be sure.  So if you post, and I mean upload a file you’ve saved on your computer and post someone else’s fanart without telling me who made it, for all I know, you did. And without probably even trying, you’ve claimed someone else’s work as your own. There’s one problem already. Here come more.

Artists often include their opinions and ideas about their art when they post it, and they’re often important to understanding what the artist meant for the picture to be about. Artists also often try to actually make money from posting their art online by taking commissions.  Artist also like to get feedback on their work, even if it’s just in the form of a like/reblog/favorite/whatever, so they can feel like they’re not wasting their time making things.

Here’s what you’re doing when you post art without sourcing it, whether you mean to or not:

——You’re saying that whatever you think about the art is more important that what the actual person who made it has to say about it. I said “neither of these pictures were made for you to use in a story” because by posting them unsourced, you’re treating them like that’s what they were made for, and acting entitled to them. You are not entitled to other people’s creations and no one owes you their work. Obviously if someone actually does draw something for you to use in a story, that’s different, and it’s between you and them what they do and don’t mind you doing with it.  But I know you’ve posted at least one picture without asking the artist first because I was the artist of one of them and I was not asked.  I’m not saying don’t get inspired by things or don’t voice your opinion on things! Just don’t prioritize getting your thoughts out there about a picture someone else drew over the thoughts of the person who drew it. Source the picture, and give the people who see your posts the opportunity to hear what the artist has to say.

——You’re also potentially messing with someone’s source of income. Say you post an unsourced picture by an artist named Bob. I see that picture and think “wow, I really like that style! I wouldn’t mind paying to have something drawn for me in that style!” But you’ve given me no way of knowing Bob drew that, and no way to find Bob. Meanwhile Bob on Bob’s blog or Bob’s deviantART account or wherever Bob posts Bob’s art is doing commissions—but without me knowing where to find Bob and purchase one, Bob just lost a potential customer! Source the picture, and help artists’ businesses instead of hurting them.

——You’re denying the artist the opportunity to get feedback on their work. Imagine spending 12 hours staring blankly at a screen, getting wrists cramps and feeling your eyes water and burn, until you finally finish a drawing. You post it on tumblr, and get maybeeeeeee 20 notes in the first few days it’s up.  Someone else sees your work, they post—not reblogit on their own blog without including a link back to you or your original post, and suddenly your art’s got 200 notes on someone else’s blog. They’re getting the notifications, they’re getting the likes and the reblogs with comments like “omigosh that’s so pretty!!!!”, and you’re getting nothing. Doesn’t that sound like it would hurt? Would you feel like sharing your art again if that’s all you’re going to get out of it? It happens every day, and plenty of artists just quit sharing their art because of it. Source the picture, and don’t let artist feel like they’re just wasting their time.

Most of the art on my blog is either reblogged or my own. If I do make an original post of someone else’s art, I include a source. Reblog the original tumblr post if there is one. If the art is from somewhere other than tumblr, like deviantART or blogspot, include a link to the deviation or to the artist’s page when you post it. If you saved it forever ago and you don’t remember where you found it, or if it’s from somewhere like weheartit or fanpop or anywhere where people just dump images they’ve found but not necessarily made, there are still options. “I didn’t make this” or “Pic not mine” are not sources. Reverse Google Image Search is a start, and here’s a link telling you how to use it.  Basically you put in an image and it gives you potential sources. If the artist signed the art with their url, go to that url and go through their art tag (or the tag on their blog for the ship/character the art is about if they don’t have an art tag!).  If you’re not willing to hunt for the source, or you’ve hunted and nothing’s come up, don’t post it. Seriously. Because if you do, all you’re doing is getting yourself notes and attention someone else should be getting.

I’m not telling you to not appreciate pretty pictures anymore, or to not be inspired by them. I’m not telling you you’re not allowed to save images on your computer, or even that you’re not allowed to post them on your tumblr, so long as you include the source.

No, you’re not the only one that does this. Yes, thousands of other people do it. That doesn’t mean it’s okay. Don’t be #1,001.

Things the TMNT fandom needs to stop doing

letssaynotonormal:

>Stop insulting people who liked the new TMNT movie.

>Stop insulting people who likes any version of the turtles that you don’t.

>Stop telling people they’re aren’t “true fans” if they like/dislike any version of the turtles.

>Don’t make people feel bad for liking any version of the turtles.
WAY too many people (even “professional” film critics) are saying stuff like “only idiots and children can like the new movie”. No movie is universally loved or hated. Saying that there has to be something wrong with a person just because they like a movie is not only an asshole thing to do but also can genuinely hurt that person. Let people enjoy what they want without being attacked or belittled. We’re just here to have fun.

shadraquarium:

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

And just even the first line in the add is fucking ridiculous. ‘Tired of getting ripped off’ for what, paying a fair wage? Fuck off.

shadraquarium:

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

And just even the first line in the add is fucking ridiculous. ‘Tired of getting ripped off’ for what, paying a fair wage? Fuck off.